Millennial Engagement Articles

Engaging millennials is more important now than ever for businesses and Human Resources departments. Generation Y is changing the face of work in many industries and businesses large and small need to adapt to their needs or risk losing out on burgeoning talent.


Twenty-something founders are crowding around health food, influencer marketing, and services for minority groups, according to the results of Inc.'s annual 30 Under 30.

As we discuss the differing preferences of the five generations that now make up the U.S. workforce, it’s easy to fall into the trap of stereotyping.

What does it take to keep your Millennials engaged in their work -- even at the entry level?

You’ve probably heard of how millennials are taking over the workforce, creating drastic changes in offices and the very nature of work itself. As a result of Generation Y entering careers and the workforce over the past decade or so, companies have to compete to lure up-and-coming talent, and employee benefits is one way to do that.

Could an infusion of younger workers shake up your corporate employee communications systems in a positive way?

Employee recruiting is never easy, especially if you’re targeting a specific subset of worker. With millennials poised to take over the job market in the next decade, what industries will have the highest concentration of younger generations in coming years?

“Ninety-one percent of Millennials (born between 1977-1997) expect to stay in a job for less than three years, according to the Future Workplace ‘Multiple Generations @ Work’ survey of 1,189 employees and 150 managers.” - Forbes

Yes, you heard it right: millennials value a diverse, collaborative work environment and don’t jump at the first job that offers the most money. When we take a seat at our computers or open our phone browser to start our job search, we have an idea in mind and we will spend hours trying to find the ideal position.

As the workplace evolves, employee communication has to evolve. With all the options available it can be tough to figure out what’s right for your business, so I’ve laid out the best features of my three favorite workplace communication apps so you can decide for yourself.

“Millennials (29%) report that higher salary is the biggest contributor to their loyalty.” – Staples, AccessPerks.com

In a study performed by Adestra, 82.9% of people check their emails randomly throughout the day. Over a fifth of the participants worry they will look less dedicated than their counterparts if they do not constantly check their emails during the day. What if emails and HR communication videos could decrease stress?

Geofencing might be one of the most powerful employee communication tools recruiters can use to reach younger generations of workers for their company.

Sometimes managing change in a younger workforce comes down to the corporate communication tools you have in place.

All corporate communication tools are designed to help employers engage and communicate with their diverse employees. Recruiting millennials will take some extra corporate communications expertise.

“An engaged workforce is optimal from an organizational performance point of view.” - Peter J. Martel, senior talent development consultant at Harvard Business School (Harvard University)

Engaging your younger generations in the workplace is a whole different ball game from employee communication and employee engagement for others. It requires more mutual understanding and flexibility, something other generations aren’t always willing to fight for.

How do you incorporate social media into your business model? Some veteran companies may not be sure how to answer that question, if they can answer at all; this is where millennials come into play.

They sound like a good idea, but everyone who works in an open office hates open offices.

American author Robert Lee Fulghum is best known for a book he created entitled All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten. The book’s title is from the first essay and poem in the volume, which was published in 1986. The author lists the lessons normally learned in American kindergarten classrooms, and he reflects upon how the world would be improved if adults adhered to the same basic rules as children. Those rules? They include listening, sharing and living a life that balances work and play. We’re now seeing those principles in employee communications systems and HR training

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