Millennial Engagement Articles

Engaging millennials is more important now than ever for businesses and Human Resources departments. Generation Y is changing the face of work in many industries and businesses large and small need to adapt to their needs or risk losing out on burgeoning talent.


It doesn’t take a psychic to see that at least one tide has turned in the employment market—recruiters are having to deal with recruits and even employees, newly hired or not, “ghosting” them.

Many people work multiple hourly, part-time jobs but still can’t afford their full-time bills. While these employees are hardworking, they often struggle financially because of unstable hours and low hourly wages. This group of people falls into the category of the underemployed. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 8% of all American workers, hourly and otherwise, are currently underemployed.

Strategic influence continues to remain strong for HR leaders, according to a new Paychex study. A vast majority say they are focused on culture to drive results, and they believe technology is boosting the employee experience. Here’s the latest thinking.

As baby boomers thank years of soaring markets, millennials and Gen Z are held back by student debt, stagnant wages.

Wall Street's reputation for demanding long hours of employees, particularly young ones, does not sit well with today's young professionals.

A recent survey from Fierce Conversations, a training company that teaches organizations how to have effective conversations, revealed key insight into the potential impact recent political and social events have had on the workplace—from who is being invited to the conversation to increased feelings of self-empowerment.

A proposed class-action lawsuit alleging Facebook’s ad placement tools facilitate discrimination against older job seekers has been expanded to identify additional companies, further widening the latest front in claims that candidates are being filtered out by gender, geography, race and age.

A Pricewaterhouse-Coopers report states that by 2020, millennial women will account for 25% of the global workforce. They are entering the workplace at bigger numbers than women in prior generations; they are highly educated with higher graduation percentages than men in their generation.

The majority of UK businesses are failing to communicate properly with their younger employees and it’s affecting their workplace morale and productivity, a new survey has found.

At some point in our lives we lose our innocence and naivety. We become afraid of being judged. We allow this fear to take over, which results in missed opportunities.

As the CEO of Artist Uprising, I have come across many lessons about millennials in the business. From my internal employees to the artists my company works with, I’m passionate about propelling people into roles that set them up for success. Companies often come to me asking why they are not attracting the millennial generation.

Twenty-something founders are crowding around health food, influencer marketing, and services for minority groups, according to the results of Inc.'s annual 30 Under 30.

As we discuss the differing preferences of the five generations that now make up the U.S. workforce, it’s easy to fall into the trap of stereotyping.

What does it take to keep your Millennials engaged in their work -- even at the entry level?

You’ve probably heard of how millennials are taking over the workforce, creating drastic changes in offices and the very nature of work itself. As a result of Generation Y entering careers and the workforce over the past decade or so, companies have to compete to lure up-and-coming talent, and employee benefits is one way to do that.

Could an infusion of younger workers shake up your corporate employee communications systems in a positive way?

Employee recruiting is never easy, especially if you’re targeting a specific subset of worker. With millennials poised to take over the job market in the next decade, what industries will have the highest concentration of younger generations in coming years?

“Ninety-one percent of Millennials (born between 1977-1997) expect to stay in a job for less than three years, according to the Future Workplace ‘Multiple Generations @ Work’ survey of 1,189 employees and 150 managers.” - Forbes

Yes, you heard it right: millennials value a diverse, collaborative work environment and don’t jump at the first job that offers the most money. When we take a seat at our computers or open our phone browser to start our job search, we have an idea in mind and we will spend hours trying to find the ideal position.

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