Corporate Culture Articles

Creating an atmosphere of excellence and purpose takes time and patience. So does building a support system that favors employees and allows them to do their best every day.


Holiday Spirit: Boost Employee Engagement by Giving Back

Maintaining employee engagement is as difficult through the winter holiday season as it is during the summer, and for many similar reasons. Some workers are taking time off to travel or spend time with their families leaving others to assist with responsibilities they may not be familiar with. But the holiday season carries with it a spirit that creates numerous opportunities to drive engagement back up—if your company embraces the essence of charity and appreciation in the season.

Often, too often, corporate culture turns toxic and entrenches itself so deeply that the organization can no longer serve its purpose effectively. This usually initiates the most painful form of change management. You're the new kid on the block, new C-suite or director or someone else with some ability to make changes to policy and employee communications standards – maybe you were even hired specifically to do that. What do you do about it? Bear with me for a brief history lesson.

Freshpet, a startup that seeks to reinvent the pet food industry with high-end dog food, is offering a fresh take on its benefit package: stock ownership.

Workplace social events and new office décor are not enough. You must meet four basic psychological needs to motivate your employees to excel.

Providing Digital Skills for the Underprivileged

PROVIDING opportunities for underserved communities to bridge the digital divide is a key facet of tech stalwart Microsoft's corporate social responsibility programmes in Singapore.

When we talk about branding and content and its relationship with employee communication, we’re really talking about emotions and perceptions. What your employees feel about the company they work for determines everything from their performance to their willingness to participate in your workplace community.

Everyone’s heard the mantra that the most effective managers, coaches, administrators, etc. are those who lead by example. Establishing and maintaining the relationship between leaders and those they lead ultimately comes down to communication—how that example is conveyed, received and understood. Can you think of a single list of “leadership qualities” that doesn’t reference communication skills somewhere in the mix? With the two so obviously linked, it makes sense to think of internal and employee communications as leadership opportunities.

One Year Since #MeToo: How Workplaces Have Changed

It’s been one year since the #MeToo movement began with The New York Times reporting the first allegations against movie producer Harvey Weinstein. So how have workplaces changed? The long and short of it: There have been positive changes, but there’s still more work to be done — and a lot of that is HR’s responsibility.

The race for better Millennial engagement and overall employee communications has made this question commonplace: When applying for a new position, do you tend to look over the company’s website and social media pages to view their work and corporate culture?

Social Capital: The Next Frontier for HR

In today’s rapidly changing world, it is essential that organization’s hire the smartest, most capable people possible. There should be little doubt that human capital is a firm’s greatest asset.

Recruitment and retention is all about finding the best candidates for your company and keeping that talent in-house. As always, employee communications is key, but identifying the best personnel before they’re hired is the best way to keep the talent pipeline open.

Corporate Culture for All Personalities

A positive, supportive corporate culture is important in all workplaces. When workers are motivated and collaborating with each other openly and with as little conflict as possible, everyone wins—everyone makes money, and everyone’s happy.

Conflict is a part of any office space, whether your employees are distributed in different locations or all working under the same roof. Since conflict is inevitable between humans trying to work together with high stakes, conflict resolution has to not only pacify the problem, it also has to lay the groundwork for better employee communication and engagement in the future.

Van driving, roofing, police work - all jobs for men. At least, that’s what a cluster of job ads placed on Facebook seemed to suggest.

Incivility is a virus that can disrupt even the most efficient work spaces. How can change management efforts and corporate culture training defeat incivility before it spreads?

I spent a substantial portion of my career in launching new products, services and businesses. Branding and content was always at the core of these projects – down to the part where the decision on the shape of a logo involved three meetings and two trans-Atlantic conference calls. Face it, the brand is the whole shebang most of the time: Apple, Google, Coca-Cola.

Maybe it’s a little bit of both but Adweek exclaims that 92% of businesses use social media platforms like LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter for recruiting new employees. So, maybe social media can be used for work and not just play.

Corporate culture and its direct byproduct, employee engagement, play a critical role in organizational success. But just because a strong culture and engaged employees are important doesn’t mean they’re easy to attain.

Corporate culture has always been affected negatively and positively by how empowered the voice of the employee is in any organization. Recently, in the wake of the #metoo movement, we’ve seen harrowing examples of management gone wrong, and power running amok.

Recent revelations about poor leadership behaviour powered by the #metoo movement are highlighting that despite policies, procedures and culture, employees still do not feel totally safe to share their observations, concerns and stories of unacceptable or downright abusive treatment without fear of reprisal. That is not acceptable.

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