Communication Best Practices

Employee communication needs to come from the heart to be effective. Thoughtfulness, effort, and repetition are the most important factors in employee communication.


It's a new year, and that means a new beginning. We resolve to lose weight, exercise more, drink less and countless other things in our personal lives. But, it's also an opportune time to focus on organizational resolutions.

Today's new-hires expect their employers to lay out the job expectations right at the start. Performance expectations are highly significant and important to employees, as well as a key factor in the success of employee onboarding and employee communications initiatives.

Most employees are aware that they should not discuss religion or politics in the office, and not only to help preserve corporate culture. However, in today's divisive political climate, many employees are ignoring that rule and divulging their political views openly in the office. When political views are discussed at work, it can have a negative impact on company culture and employee communications.

There are a tremendous number of words and phrases being used in today’s workplace to enhance communications best practices. Some have become very familiar: corporate culture, change management, employee communication, business process management, and talent onboarding, to name a few. Corporate culture, in its broadest sense, is an organization’s collective beliefs and practices, which affect its interactions among employees and customers alike. There’s a phrase, “best practices,” that is used in business to define the most effective method to deal with an issue. Some companies become infected with what could be termed “worst practices.”

According to the Nemertes 2018-19 Visual Communication and Collaboration Study, over one-third of organizations are planning to expand video employee communications and conferencing technology in large meeting rooms (10+ people). The study, which examined five hundred companies, found that 20% of large conference rooms have video communications capabilities and that number is expected to rise greatly.

Tools and Apps. Everyone knows what the word “app” means. It hasn’t been around since the beginning of time as we know it, but it’s been in use far longer than many realize. According to an article by Thom Holwerda for OS News, the term was initially used in job postings for programmers starting in 1981. The abbreviated form of “applications” was utilized in employee communication and recruiting simply because job postings cost money. The higher the word count, the more expensive the ad. And programmers knew what “apps” stood for.

It seems pretty obvious that health and financial wellness benefits ought to be very popular and should enjoy high levels of employee engagement. Some are popular and do enjoy high levels of engagement, but many don't. To figure out what doesn't work is easiest if we ask which benefits get the most engagement and work backwards from there.

Conflict is a part of any office space, whether your employees are distributed in different locations or all working under the same roof. Since conflict is inevitable between humans trying to work together with high stakes, conflict resolution has to not only pacify the problem, it also has to lay the groundwork for better employee communication and engagement in the future.

Corporate culture has always been affected negatively and positively by how empowered the voice of the employee is in any organization. Recently, in the wake of the #metoo movement, we’ve seen harrowing examples of management gone wrong, and power running amok.

Simply having a health insurance plan available to your employees is no longer enough to ensure that they actually enroll. This can be incredibly frustrating for any business, as healthcare is part of any reputable company’s employee benefits package.

Employee communication is all about getting the same messages out to the people who need information. It’s also about personalizing communications so that each employee gets the information they need to do their jobs well and make good decisions. Video communications is great, but what features separate some communications platforms from others?

Americans are worried, some more than others. The source of worry? Money. And as we are reminded in the lyrics to a song from Cabaret, “Money makes the world go ‘round.” It does. Money buys more than things, it buys choices. And there’s an unhappy percentage of Americans that correctly perceive they have no choices at all. This is why Human Resources departments and companies need to provide health and financial wellness options for employees.

Fighting disengagement is an uphill battle for any manager in any professional setting. Fortunately, there are tools out there to help you in the fight for employee engagement, such as video communication and good ol’ simplicity.

Every HR professional understands that employee benefits are one of the biggest reasons employees choose one job over another, and your company provides great benefits—a quality health insurance plan, for example. In fact, Open Enrollment is coming up, so naturally your employees should all be lining up to take part in your health insurance plan.

Most American workers are workaholics and refuse to take time off work. Studies reveal that more than half are leaving their vacation time unused. While most businesses appreciate the dedication and commitment of hardworking employees to their companies, employers need to encourage their workers to take time off and enjoy a fun summer vacation. It will do wonders not only for their physical and mental health but their overall job-performance in the company.

For some high school and college students, summer is the time to get away from the regimens of classes, lectures and “school” life. For others, the 8-12 week period is the doorway to firsthand experiences of employee communication in real-world employment. Although some organizations offer internship programs year-round, summer is the peak season for intern endeavors.

Every article you’ve ever read about bosses starts with this quote:

“Employees don’t quit jobs. They quit bosses.”

After the now-famous meeting of the 17 people who would build the Agile Manifesto in 2001, their revolutionary ideas have infiltrated not just the world of software development, but also all facets of business organization, Human Resources, and corporate culture. How has culture and management improved since the advent of Agile, and how can you use the Agile Manifesto to improve your workplace culture?

Should employee benefits include summer vacation as a matter of course? The data says ‘yes.’

A boss’ job is to direct and lead his team towards a common goal that is consistent with the overall business message. A boss’ job is to instruct and give necessary feedback to improve the workings of employees. Most importantly, a boss’ job is to ensure the belief in what the company stands for and encourage others to become as passionate as he/she is.

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