Corporate Culture Articles

Creating an atmosphere of excellence and purpose takes time and patience. So does building a support system that favors employees and allows them to do their best every day.


One Year Since #MeToo: How Workplaces Have Changed

It’s been one year since the #MeToo movement began with The New York Times reporting the first allegations against movie producer Harvey Weinstein. So how have workplaces changed? The long and short of it: There have been positive changes, but there’s still more work to be done — and a lot of that is HR’s responsibility.

The race for better Millennial engagement and overall employee communications has made this question commonplace: When applying for a new position, do you tend to look over the company’s website and social media pages to view their work and corporate culture?

Social Capital: The Next Frontier for HR

In today’s rapidly changing world, it is essential that organization’s hire the smartest, most capable people possible. There should be little doubt that human capital is a firm’s greatest asset.

Recruitment and retention is all about finding the best candidates for your company and keeping that talent in-house. As always, employee communications is key, but identifying the best personnel before they’re hired is the best way to keep the talent pipeline open.

Corporate Culture for All Personalities

A positive, supportive corporate culture is important in all workplaces. When workers are motivated and collaborating with each other openly and with as little conflict as possible, everyone wins—everyone makes money, and everyone’s happy.

Conflict is a part of any office space, whether your employees are distributed in different locations or all working under the same roof. Since conflict is inevitable between humans trying to work together with high stakes, conflict resolution has to not only pacify the problem, it also has to lay the groundwork for better employee communication and engagement in the future.

Van driving, roofing, police work - all jobs for men. At least, that’s what a cluster of job ads placed on Facebook seemed to suggest.

Incivility is a virus that can disrupt even the most efficient work spaces. How can change management efforts and corporate culture training defeat incivility before it spreads?

I spent a substantial portion of my career in launching new products, services and businesses. Branding and content was always at the core of these projects – down to the part where the decision on the shape of a logo involved three meetings and two trans-Atlantic conference calls. Face it, the brand is the whole shebang most of the time: Apple, Google, Coca-Cola.

Maybe it’s a little bit of both but Adweek exclaims that 92% of businesses use social media platforms like LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter for recruiting new employees. So, maybe social media can be used for work and not just play.

Corporate culture and its direct byproduct, employee engagement, play a critical role in organizational success. But just because a strong culture and engaged employees are important doesn’t mean they’re easy to attain.

Corporate culture has always been affected negatively and positively by how empowered the voice of the employee is in any organization. Recently, in the wake of the #metoo movement, we’ve seen harrowing examples of management gone wrong, and power running amok.

Recent revelations about poor leadership behaviour powered by the #metoo movement are highlighting that despite policies, procedures and culture, employees still do not feel totally safe to share their observations, concerns and stories of unacceptable or downright abusive treatment without fear of reprisal. That is not acceptable.

What you Need to Know about Knowing your Stuff

Drucker found many professionals failed because they spent more time on office politics than they did on knowing what they were supposed to know. It is unfortunately true that some otherwise skilled professionals don’t “know their stuff” to the extent that they should, and don’t seem much to care.

Cultivate a thriving environment where your workers can flourish by embracing transparency, flexibility and empathy.

Employee Communications and video communications are becoming more intertwined every day in the Human Resources world. Even with technology changing employee engagement, the name of the game is still communication. That’s why I had used that word twice in my title.

Americans are worried, some more than others. The source of worry? Money. And as we are reminded in the lyrics to a song from Cabaret, “Money makes the world go ‘round.” It does. Money buys more than things, it buys choices. And there’s an unhappy percentage of Americans that correctly perceive they have no choices at all. This is why Human Resources departments and companies need to provide health and financial wellness options for employees.

This week marks the third anniversary of Hamilton: An American Musical’s Broadway opening. It’s been a remarkable run. Hamilton now has productions in New York, Chicago, and London, with a traveling company that is touring the U.S., opening most nights to sold-out houses of diehard HamilFans.

Security Should be Part of Your Company’s Culture

Technology has historically moved the dial on where, how and when work is done. In the past, smartphones brought on a new level of mobility and flexibility. Now, voice technology, artificial intelligence and blockchain are revolutionizing the modern workplace. But as digital innovation progresses, the cultural shift around digital security must evolve equally as fast.

Fun fact: the average business today uses over 300 applications to run the enterprise. Employees shift between these apps every two to three minutes, and according to McKinsey, spend almost 50 percent of their time searching for information and managing communications.

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